Before you plant BEWARE!

Before you plant BEWARE! What you plant may be detrimental to the local environment. Did you know that New York State has a prohibited and regulated Invasive plants list, https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_forests_pdf/isprohibitedplants2.pdf? Prohibited invasive species cannot be knowingly possessed with the intent to sell, import, purchase, transport or introduce. In addition, no person shall sell, import, purchase, transport, introduce or propagate prohibited invasive species. An example of … Continue reading Before you plant BEWARE!

A Batesian Mimic, The Bee Fly

Flies (Diptera spp.) are an eclectic group of pollinators with many species that mimic bees.  The bee fly or humblefly is a perfect example of a batesian mimic, a harmless fly mimicking a potentially harmful bee as a deterrent to predation.   This fuzzy little fly, reminiscent of a bumble bee, has a stout body, very long legs and a very long proboscis that allow … Continue reading A Batesian Mimic, The Bee Fly

Buttonbush a Midsummer Favorite

Growing in the Hudson Highland wetlands, the buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is at home alongside tussock grasses with roots growing in spongy sphagnum moss.   It thrives in full to partial sun alongside high bush blueberry and sweet azalea.   Black gum, red maple and mountain laurel find their niche on the slightly drier edges before the forest transitions into a drier oak forest.  This edge habitat … Continue reading Buttonbush a Midsummer Favorite

Pollinator Haven at Wave Hill

Wave Hill in the Bronx is a 28 acre garden, an oasis that transports visitors to another world. The vista from the Pergola Overlook commands the attention of the Palisades, sheer cliffs that rise from the western shore of the Hudson River. The gardens form a pollinator haven amid an urban landscape. There is mounting evidence that planting flower patches in urban gardens and green … Continue reading Pollinator Haven at Wave Hill

Osmia: Powerhouse Pollinators

The blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria) is a fast efficient native pollinator of early spring flowers. In the apple orchard 250 to 300 of these powerhouse pollinators can do the equivalent work of 90,000 (two hives) honey bees.  Part of this success is due to their ability to visit more flowers per minute and to transfer pollen more effectively.  It is also helpful that some … Continue reading Osmia: Powerhouse Pollinators

Pussytoes: An Inconspicuous Little Plant

Ladies’ tabacco, Plantain-leaved everlasting, Plantain-leaved pussytoes, Pussytoes are common names for Antennaria plantaginifolia, an inconspicuous little plant in the Aster family.  It thrives in full sun and is perfectly suited for poor dry rocky soils.  Paddle shaped leaves are reminiscent of the common plantain (Plantago major) except they are hairy  leaves with three to five parallel veins.  The flower itself stands no higher than 6” … Continue reading Pussytoes: An Inconspicuous Little Plant

Native North American Honey Bees?

The European Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) arrived in the Americas aboard European ships around 1622. In a way this was a homecoming, America had regained her long lost honey bees. It has always been assumed that honey bees are not native to North America until a recent discovery found a single fossil of a native North American honey bee in the Stewart Valley basin in … Continue reading Native North American Honey Bees?

A Garden of Specialists

On a recent August morning, Native Beeology founder, Tim Stanley and the YMCA Kingston Farm Project staff and interns gathered together to explore the urban garden and see what bees were busy at work pollinating the plants in blossom. The mission of the Kingston YMCA is to educate and empower young people and their families in the City of Kingston by directly engaging them in … Continue reading A Garden of Specialists

The Pollinators of Stony Kill Farm

Suzanne, Elizabeth and Wilhelmina burst out of the manor house into the wide open spaces of Stony Kill Farm. The three sisters ran down the farm lane with intentions to play hide and seek in the barn but suddenly they spot an yellow tiger swallowtail butterfly fluttering in the hayfields. They look at each other and in silent accord jump with leap and bounds through … Continue reading The Pollinators of Stony Kill Farm