The Perfect Lawn for Pollinators

The perfect lawn is the imperfect lawn.  The perfect lawn is rugged and natural in appearance and to the untrained eye, aka the average homeowner, would be condemned as the eyesore of the neighborhood. It is a lawn that defies cultural norms but can be aesthetically pleasing.  It has wild edges where shrubs and wildflowers seduce pollinators with sweet smells and bright colors. Unkempt corners, … Continue reading The Perfect Lawn for Pollinators

Spotlight on Dufourea novaeangliae, the Pickerel Bee

On a recent canoe trip to the Adirondacks, a steady rain had passed over and the sun peeked through the clouds illuminating the aquatic vegetation. I took a moment to see if any pollinators were visiting the white water lily (Nymphaea odorata) and after seeing no activity I wondered who the might pollinate such an ornate flower. Though bees may visit them, beetles are the … Continue reading Spotlight on Dufourea novaeangliae, the Pickerel Bee

Spring Flowers and Wild Bees of “Slabsides”

It is hard to imagine a more fitting place to explore and observe nature than at the woodland retreat of, American naturalist, John Burroughs.   Today’s outdoor enthusiast can follow in his footsteps and sit on the porch of his rustic home called, Slabsides situated on a rocky crag overlooking Celery Swamp.    This 200 acre oasis is located in the Black Creek watershed on … Continue reading Spring Flowers and Wild Bees of “Slabsides”

The Spring Bees of Peach Hill

Spring is a marvelous time to explore an old apple orchard.  Walking under the white blossomed branches it is reassuring to know that the flowers are abuzz with busy pollinators, ensuring a bountiful fall harvest of sumptous red fruit.  Peach Hill Park is one such abandoned apple orchard in the Town of Poughkeepsie, containing 10,000 trees.  The park encompasses 159 acres and is also is … Continue reading The Spring Bees of Peach Hill

Cellophane Bees at Work!

Cellophane bees like 70% of solitary bees nest underground and often receive a bum rap due to confusion with ground nesting yellow jackets.  Yellow jackets are not bees but wasps and like most wasps are predators preying on insects.  In addition, yellow jackets are social insects (like honeybees and bumble bees) living in hive and are on high alert to serve and protect the single … Continue reading Cellophane Bees at Work!